SEO Recruitment Advice

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This topic contains 15 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by   Neil Ludlow .

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  • #4454

    Ronald Hesketh
    Member

    Recruitment advice:

    I’d like to hire a junior team member to help out with SEO projects. I’m after someone local to me and entry level who wants to learn and get into the industry, maybe even an intern from the local university. Any tips on how to recruit and what to look for?

  • #4455

    Simon Scott
    Member

    Ditto. We are on the search for someone in the LA area with WordPress experience. We have tried indeed. Any other advice?

    • #4456

      Simon Scott
      Member

      I haven’t tried anything yet. Just giving it some though. Thinking of going directly to the universities that are local to us (London) and recruiting talent from there.

  • #4457

    Nurul Khan
    Member

    Why on earth would you want to hire a noob?

    • #4458

      Nurul Khan
      Member

      Because we want the right cultural fit. I want to train someone up to do things in a particular way and also to give them the skills to prepare them for later down the line.

    • #4459

      Nurul Khan
      Member

      Do you even know what skill sets you want? Have you dealt with millennial’s – they are ….. I have in-house: 1 developer, 1 Facebook expert who is skilling up in AdWords, 1 in house content writer and a team of 60 os and myself as well as numerous other contractors globally. If you want to scale then you want experience. You will then be able to charge more. I’ve been where you are, it’s not worth the hassle.

    • #4460

      Stuart Erskine
      Member

      I recruited an intern in a past role and it was a great experience. They learned a lot and I got someone to take a lot of stuff off my hands. We already have more experienced team members doing the technical stuff, it’s more of the more admin, laborious stuff I’d like the help with. Working millennial’s should be alright seeing as I am one.

    • #4461

      Paul Davis
      Member

      As I said, your call.

  • #4462

    Christopher Copp
    Member

    Great question:

    1. Always hire personality first. (Skills can be taught)
    2. Have that person shadow you for a while
    3. Their role should be to do all the tedious admin and research tasks that you shouldn’t be doing anymore. You should be focused on the bigger things like sales, SEO strategy, etc…

    Good luck!

    • #4463

      Claire Wallace
      Member

      That’s exactly the type of thing I have in mind. Thanks

    • #4464

      Peter Wootton
      Keymaster

      My first hire was new to the industry. This person shadowed me for a month and eventually took 80% of my work off my plate which included setting up meetings, follow up calls, calendar, scheduling, contract signing, grammar checking, research, organisation, and so much more.

    • #4465

      Simon Chapman
      Member

      My first hire was new to the industry. This person shadowed me for a month and eventually took 80% of my work off my plate which included setting up meetings, follow up calls, calendar, scheduling, contract signing, grammar checking, research, organisation, and so much more.

      I could then do more of the big stuff that only i can do.
      This is great way to scale your business.

    • #4466

      Anders Jensen
      Member

      My first hire was new to the industry. This person shadowed me for a month and eventually took 80% of my work off my plate which included setting up meetings, follow up calls, calendar, scheduling, contract signing, grammar checking, research, organisation, and so much more.

      I could then do more of the big stuff that only i can do.
      This is great way to scale your business.

  • #4467

    Lynne Haskell
    Member

    Look at a digital marketing apprentice, we have gone this route and has worked well, there are some fab youngster out their that somehow fell through the gaps and are great and willing to learn.

  • #4468

    Colin Hodgson
    Member

    I have used interns from our local university. It’s a great fit. They fulfil any obligations for their degree, they get on-the-job training and it is a probationary period to see if it is a fit. In our area they are required to complete 300 hours of internship to graduate. Candidates go through the same interview process as if you were hiring. I look for the business majors with a focus in marketing.

    • #4469

      Neil Ludlow
      Member

      Glad to hear this worked well for you. This is the route I’m leaning towards. I did a sandwich degree myself and had a great experience with a one year paid internship in between. I’d love to give that opportunity to someone else. (The unpaid internship where I was treated badly was after I graduated – that was essentially slave labour!)

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